Skip to main content
Tag

Planning

Medicaid for Assisted Living

By Uncategorized

Assisted Living

The RI Medicaid program covers assisted living services in State-licensed Assisted Living Residences (ALRs) that are certified to participate in the long-term services and support (LTSS) program. Covered services include on-site, 24-hour personal care assistance, homemaker and chore services, medication management, therapeutic, social and recreational activities, and health-related transportation. The amount of these services a person receives may differ based on the scope of their needs.

Medicaid does not cover ALR room and board and add-on services. A person who chooses this Medicaid LTSS option must pay from other resources housing charges and any non-Medicaid covered services (like cable and internet access) they choose to receive from the ALR. To ensure individuals applying can afford these costs, the dollar amount a certified ALR can charge for housing each month is capped. Rhode Island also has a State Supplemental Payment (SSP) program that provides financial help to low-income Medicaid beneficiaries living in ALRs. Depending on the scope of a person’s needs, access to some of the Medicaid certified assisted living residences may not be available.Assisted Living Activities

How to receive services

Case management agencies contracted by the Office of Healthy Aging assist individuals in completing a Medicaid LTSS application, assess the scope of their needs, and assist them in developing a person-centered plan of care. These agencies are also responsible for monitoring the delivery of services in the plan of care and coordinating linkages to benefits across community-based health and social service agencies.

Related Service

Nursing and skilled therapy services are not part of the Medicaid-assisted living services but may be authorized by Medicaid and/or other health insurance, as ordered by a physician.

Who is Eligible?

Adults 19-65 with disabilities, or anyone 65 or older who is eligible for Medicaid LTSS.

Need Assistance Applying?

For more information about Medicaid covered assisted living services and to apply for the same, call THE POINT at 401-462-4444.

A list of assisted living communities is located here

 

FRAUD: The “F” Word of Estate Planning

By Uncategorized

Fraud is a label to run from – not walk from

As an attorney that practices in areas of law that have both local and national scope – reading and reviewing scholarly writings and recent case decisions is critical to staying current. From these readings, we come to learn and respect the work done by other attorneys and how they are best representing their clients and their interest.

One such article came across my desk entitled “Medicaid Planning Technique Didn’t Work Exactly as Intended” a link to the full article can be found HERE.

The article examines what could be best described as a case study of one attorneys recommendations to a client who was retained to assist the family with Medicaid planning and qualification. As the title infers, the plan did not work out as explained and the clients goals and objectives were not carried out with the suggested plan proposed and enacted by the attorney. Fraud ruins any thought of a clever estate plan – and once that genie is let out of the bottle – it is hard to get it back in.

If it seems too good to be true – it probably is

The case is a lesson for both client and attorney. Just because you can do something – does not always mean you should. Deciding on an estate plan with the goal of qualifying for Medicaid benefits is something that must weigh all of the factors and rules. Knowledge of family dynamic, conflicts, tensions, and history are as important as understanding the rules of Medicaid eligibility, assets and income.

Fraud is a badge that does not wash off easily. Having to defend yourself or others from being accused of absconding with the assets of an elderly loved one is not something anyone wants to envision. There are legal consequences – which translate into strained relationships and possibly property and certainly financial penalties with the ultimate loss of liberty.

The author of the article makes the following suggestions when selecting an elder law attorney to work with:

  1. Be careful about selecting your lawyer. Do you want someone who really knows estate planning and/or Medicaid planning? Check out their reputation, their online information, and recommendations from friends and colleagues. Did you meet the lawyer at a promotional seminar at the public library or a local restaurant? Make sure you’re not being sold something you don’t really want or need.
  2. Does a particular Medicaid planning technique sound almost too good to be true? Be suspicious and ask for input from others.
  3. When a lawyer agrees to meet with you and your family member together, that suggests something troublesome. We are supposed to represent just one person, not a whole family. Recognize that your interests and those of your family member might differ, and respect the lawyer’s efforts to maintain that separation.
  4. Recognize that even though an idea — and particularly a Medicaid planning technique — might work, it might also have unintended secondary effects.

 

RMD Tables To Be Updated

By Uncategorized

Required Minimum Distributions: RMD’s

Section 401(a)(9) requires most retirement plans and individual retirement accounts to make required minimum distributions (“RMDs”) over the lifetime of the individual (or the lifetime of the individual and certain designated beneficiaries) beginning no later than such individual’s required beginning date (generally, April 1 in the year following attainment of age 72). This minimum amount is determined by dividing the individual’s account balance by the applicable distribution period found in one of the life expectancy and distribution tables (the “Tables”).

On November 12, 2020 the Department of Treasury is scheduled to publish final regulations updating the Tables, which is in response to an Executive Order issued in August of 2018 directing the Secretary of the Treasury to review the Tables to determine if they should be updated to reflect current mortality data.

RMD’s Tables are being updated

Longer Life Expectancies Reflected

The updated Tables will generally reflect longer life expectancies than presently reflected in the current Tables last published based on 2003 mortality rates. For example, the current Tables use a life expectancy of 25.6 years for a 72-year-old for purposes of calculating the RMD while the updated Tables will use a life expectancy of 27.4 years. This will result in reduced RMDs, enabling individuals to retain larger balances in retirement accounts to account for the possibility of living longer.

The updated Tables will be effective for distributions beginning on or after January 1, 2022 and will include a transition to ‘re-set’ the life expectancy for certain individuals already receiving RMDs based on the prior Tables. For example, an individual who attains age 72 in 2021 will be required to take an RMD no later than April 1, 2022. The updated Tables will not apply to calculate the individual’s 2021 RMD (paid on or before April 1, 2022), but the updated Tables will apply to the 2022 RMD (paid on or before December 31, 2022). The regulations do not include periodic automatic updates to the Tables. Instead, the Treasury and IRS will review the Tables at the earlier of 10 years or whenever a new study of mortality experience is published. The final regulation and new Tables can be found here.

Impact on Medicaid and Estate Planning

RMD’s are a factor that every estate planner must consider into calculations of income and assets for Medicaid eligibility. Understanding the new tables and income that will be forced out to a individual or spouse is important to know as there are minimum and maximum income limits. A personal consult with an estate planning attorney can best illustrate the impact this will have on your plan.

Should I Convert To A ROTH IRA?

By Uncategorized

What is the difference between a Roth IRA and a Traditional IRA?

Roth IRA is an individual retirement account that offers tax-free growth and tax-free withdrawals in retirement. Roth IRA rules dictate that as long as you’ve owned your account for 5 years and you’re age 59½ or older, you can withdraw your money when you want to and you won’t owe any federal taxes.

A Traditional IRA is a type of individual retirement account that lets your earnings grow tax-deferred. You pay taxes on your investment gains only when you make withdrawals in retirement.

In addition, when planning for an considering long term care planning and possibly needing to qualify for Medicaid, most states do not deem Qualified Accounts such as 401(K)’s and IRA’s and Roth IRA’s as countable resources.

Therefore, the decision to make is: Do I take the income tax hit now and convert to a Roth IRA, or do I wait take it later when I start drawing down on the traditional IRA or 401(K)?

Should I Convert to a Roth IRA?

Roth IRA conversions have been available for many years. Two recent developments suggest that you reconsider Roth IRA conversions for yourself in 2020:

  • The government’s response to COVID-19 significantly raises the Federal deficit, making it more likely that tax rates will be going up in the future.
  • You may be in a lower tax bracket in 2020, which would reduce the tax cost of the conversion.

Both of these factors make Roth IRA conversions more attractive than they were in 2019. The decision as to whether these factors tip the scale in favor of a Roth IRA conversion will require careful consideration. You will need to consider your overall financial plan and make certain assumptions.

Who should do a Roth IRA conversion?

The ideal candidate for a Roth IRA conversion would check off most or all of these boxes:

  • You can pay the tax on the conversion out of a taxable investment portfolio.
  • You expect that you will be in the highest income tax bracket in the future when IRA distributions would be required.
  • You expect that you will not need to withdraw funds from the Roth IRA during your lifetime.
  • You expect that your estate will be subject to estate tax at your death and your spouse.

Who should not do a Roth IRA Conversion?

Some people who should not do a Roth IRA conversion currently are as follows:

  • People who expect to be in a lower tax bracket at retirement.
  • People who can use IRA distributions to take advantage of the lower brackets.
  • People who want to preserve the option of using income from their IRA to offset future medical costs for long-term care or other significant medical expenses, bearing in mind the the principal balances are protected and currently not deemed a countable resource in many states.
  • People who plan to use their IRA for charitable contributions.

Want to discuss how conversion will impact you? Contact us for a no obligation consultation.

SOURCE: LISI Employee Benefits & Retirement Planning Newsletter #737 (June 9, 2020)

Estate Planning and the Coronavirus Pandemic

By Uncategorized

Estate Planning Amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic

The Coronavirus (COVID-19) Pandemic has impacted every corner of the world at this point. As medical experts, financial advisors, and our colleagues that specialize in healthcare law, employment law, and other related areas are busy advising clients on the best course of action for the weeks and months ahead, we – as estate planners – also want to remind our clients and friends of some important considerations during these uncertain times.

At this point, we would simply promote the following actions to ensure that your estate planning affairs are in order:

(1) Review your existing documents. Make sure that you have copies (either paper or electronic) of your existing estate planning documents, and review them to confirm that they still reflect your wishes. If you cannot locate your documents, consider calling or emailing your estate planning attorney to obtain copies.

(2) Pinpoint any items that require attention sooner rather than later. As you review, take note of any major changes that may have occurred in your family since you last updated your estate plan. These might include child births, deaths, marriages, divorces, etc. And also consider whether the individuals that you previously appointed to serve as your agents are still appropriate.

(3) Follow up with your loved ones and advisors.

  • Make sure that your loved ones know to contact your estate planning attorney in the event anything should happen to you. This includes your named executor (i.e. personal representative under your will, or trustee of your trust), guardian for your minor children, attorney-in-fact under your financial durable power of attorney, and patient advocate under your health care power of attorney.
  • Consider reaching out to your financial advisor, insurance advisor, etc. to ensure that your beneficiary designations are up to date and discuss any new planning opportunities relative to your current financial status.
  • If you require any medical attention in the near future, confirm that your medical provider has a copy of your patient advocate designation and is informed as to who you wish to have access to your confidential health information.

NOTE – If you do not already have an estate plan, now is as good of a time as any to consider the opportunity before you. Having a will/trust, a durable general power of attorney, and a healthcare power of attorney can certainly contribute to a healthy state of mind.

Medicare Update 2019

By Estate Planning

Medicare 2019 – Everything You Need To Know

Medicare is an important piece of the American insurance landscape, not only for people age 65 and older, but for all Americans. That said, this benefit is not easy to navigate. Eligible individuals must be thoughtful about the coverage they need, the timing of enrollment, and coordination with other healthcare benefits, if they want to make the most of the Medicare program.

Attached is a report recently published by Northern Trust that recaps the Medicare program and is a good resource for people wanting to learn more.

It addresses the following questions:

  1. What does Medicare cover? Do I still need Private Insurance?
  2. How much does it cost?
  3. I am thinking about early retirement but I am concerned about health insurance coverage and eligibility. What are my options?
  4. I am turning 65 next year and still working, should I transition from private insurance to Medicare and if so, how do I do that?

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL REPORT wpi-medicare 2019

Medicare is a critical component of every persons health insurance portfolio but it does not cover long-term skilled nursing. The Medicaid program covers eligible individuals cost for long term skilled nursing, however, there asset and income limits before someone becomes eligible. Generally, a person must have countable assets below $4,000 and monthly income below $10,000 to be eligible. A person who is on Medicare and then transitions over to Medicaid will be required to maintain their Medicare coverage. Medicaid being a welfare program, is an insurer of last resort, whereas Medicare is a primary insurance for people.

Still have questions about planning for your future healthcare needs including long term care planning? Contact us for a no cost consultation.

Matt Leonard

New drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease under study at Butler Hospital

By News, Uncategorized

Alzheimer’s disease and estate planning

When caring for and planning for an individual, we address the financial and legal aspects of caring for a loved elderly one. These planning considerations do not happen in a vacuum. The decisions we make rely on the medical issues, complications and opportunities available to us. Knowing about treatment options and emerging science is critical in planning for future needs. Alzheimer’s disease robs cognitive ability and causes those who are afflicted to need long-term skilled nursing care.

When medical breakthroughs are occurring on diseases the are often require long term nursing care, we must share and learn as to their success and progress. Such studies and advancements are occurring at Butler Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island as evidenced by the attached link to an article published by the Providence Journal.

Source: New drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease under study at Butler Hospital

 

Co-pays proposed as part of $166M in Medicaid cuts

By News, Uncategorized

Co-Pays and Not Changes to Eligibility Proposed

Gov. Gina Raimondo has proposed balancing next year’s $9.38-billion budget with nearly $166 million in cuts to Medicaid. None of the changes will affect eligibility or benefits, officials said. Co-Pays and other cost reducing strategies will be implemented.

A plan to “rebalance” long-term care and nursing home services would account for another $18.2 million in savings. That includes “modernizing” the eligibility process for long-term care. The budget also calls for a 1-percent increase to nursing home reimbursement rates. In recent years, those rates have seen as much as a 3-percent increase.

Asked if he expected backlash from the nursing homes, Beane said, “I think, frankly, the nursing homes will be pleased to see that some part of the COLA is going to be included here. That’s the first time the governor’s proposed budget has included an increase. She has said in her cover letter to this budget that if revenues are up, this is an area she’d like to see more investment.”

Source: Co-pays proposed as part of $166M in Medicaid cuts

As the long term care insurance market continues to struggle with its future, knowledge as to the rules of Medicaid eligibility that will pay for long term skilled nursing is critical. Individuals can only have $4,000 of countable resources to qualify for Medicaid. Your home, car and personal property is not a countable resource and is protected. Under the proposed budget, those rules appear to remain unchanged. However, what are you to do with savings, investment accounts, a second home or investment property? Will you be forced to liquidate those assets and spend them down on my long term nursing care below $4,000 before I qualify for Medicaid? Without  a plan and proper advice, the answer is likely yes for most. However, with a proper plan, these assets can be protected for yourself, your spouse and your heirs. Contact us to discuss how.

Research in war against Alzheimer’s

By Uncategorized

Promising new research on Alzheimer’s at Butler Hospital and Brown University begins with a simple swab of the cheek

Cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer’s is a prevalent cause for needing long-term care. As the disease progresses, it undermines a persons ability to live independently in the community. Families who are faced with this disease, are a loss as to how to care for their loved ones. Estate Planning is a critical step in this process. Another, is learning and understanding more about the disease and what research is being done around it.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. — The weather one recent evening reflected the nature of the topic when a small crowd gathered at Butler Hospital to learn more about Alzheimer’s disease. It was cold and dark — in a word, gloomy.

Such is the illness, which erases memory and personality while burdening relatives and caregivers on its path to inevitable death. As yet, there is no cure.

But the man who drew these people from the comfort of home preaches hope, in the form of groundbreaking research he conducts with other scientists around the world.

On this evening, Dr. Stephen P. Salloway did more than preach.

Using the military metaphor he favors, he sought to enlist recruits in a new phase of a campaign he likens to the Second World War, when, against great odds, Allied forces defeated a mighty foe.

“I’m very excited that we are building an infrastructure worldwide to fight Alzheimer’s disease,” Salloway said as he began his presentation. “Many of our same allies in World War II are allies in this fight against Alzheimer’s.”

The scientist projected a slide describing research efforts around the planet, with Europe, Australia, North America and parts of Asia pinpointed as strategic centers.

“We are making progress, and there are other initiatives and consortiums, here and abroad, moving this forward,” Salloway said.

On he went, through slides of diseased brains, of German neuropathologist Alois Alzheimer’s first, historic patient, and of the APOE gene, which may indicate increased risk of the disease, depending on which of six possible variants an individual carries. Other factors, including age, diet, lifestyle and overall health, also influence risk.

With researchers elsewhere, Salloway and his team at Butler’s Memory and Aging Program are seeking volunteers to enlist in the so-called Generation Study, for men and women age 60 to 75 who are cognitively normal — but may be at risk, depending on their genetic makeup.

Screening begins with a swab of the cheek, which is analyzed for the APOE gene; eligible candidates may then decide to enroll in clinical studies of new medications, including a drug known as CNP520, which has just entered a trial sponsored by Novartis Pharmaceuticals in collaboration with Amgen and Banner Alzheimer’s Institute.

“Not only can you find out your genetic risk by having the APOE test,” Salloway said, “but then if you’re the right age group and meet the criteria and you’re interested, you could also participate in a prevention trial to try to lower the risk. We’re very excited about that.”

Many in the audience were as well. Eighteen would sign the necessary papers and have their cheeks swabbed. They would become the latest recruits in Salloway’s citizen army — which, when all studies and the Butler prevention registry are counted, now numbers more than 800.

Salloway’s aim is much higher.

Sandra Robinson Gandsman, a Pawtucket resident who spent most of her career in health-care marketing, was among those who enlisted with a swab and her signature. She was motivated, in part, by her knowledge of disease.

“Very honestly, this is more frightening than cancer,” Gandsman told The Journal. “If you get a diagnosis of cancer, there’s a possibility you can be cured. Certainly there are treatments that you can take. But Alzheimer’s — it’s kind of like, ‘Wow, there’s not much there.’”

The work of Salloway and others, she said, could put something there. Lives could be transformed for the better. New generations could escape the threat altogether if promising avenues prove true.

Sentiment also motivates Gandsman. She related the experience of a 73-year-old friend diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer’s — that “mild” first of three phases of the disease characterized by “challenges performing tasks in social or work settings” and “forgetting material that one has just read,” among other symptoms, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

“I noticed for a couple of years a lot of forgetfulness and repetition,” Gandsman said of her friend.

One day, she stepped on the tennis court with the woman, who had played the game for decades and was skilled at it.

“She didn’t know where she was,” Gandsman said. “She couldn’t keep score, but she didn’t know she couldn’t. She hit the ball and wasn’t sure where she was supposed to stand. I immediately called her husband. I thought she’d had a small stroke.”

She hadn’t.

“Her husband had been covering for her,” Gandsman said. “I didn’t realize it at the time.”

It was not hyperbole.

The prevalence of the disease doubles every five years after age 65, reaching as high as half of all people 85 and older. Lacking major advances, by 2050 an estimated 125 million people worldwide will have dementia, a broad category of brain afflictions that includes Alzheimer’s. Health-care costs for U.S. Alzheimer’s patients was estimated at $259 billion in 2017, a figure that does not include the billions of hours of free care, typically accompanied by significant emotional and other stresses, that family and friends provide.

Beyond the statistics is the reality of becoming one, as Salloway’s audience — mostly middle-age and older — acknowledged.

“If you ask older people what disease they fear most, what’s number one?” Salloway said.

“Alzheimer’s,” was the collective response.

“Why?”

But optimism co-exists with alarm, which is another theme Salloway strikes when he speaks to the public, as he does regularly. Building an army is more than a desk job.

“In order to make a difference, we need to find better treatment,” he said. “Congress is getting older and they’re worried about Alzheimer’s, too. That’s one of the few things that Democrats and Republicans agree on: that Alzheimer’s is bad. And so there is now a national plan to fight Alzheimer’s, with a major goal of developing breakthrough treatments by 2025. And we’re working hard to meet that goal.”

Congress has done more than pay lip service, Salloway said, and his slide confirmed it: National Institutes of Health funding for Alzheimer’s research rose from $448 million in 2011 to $991 million in 2016, surpassing the billion-dollar mark last year, when it reached $1.39 billion. This year, research funding is projected to reach $1.8 billion.

“Cancer is $6 billion, so we’re still well below that, but we’re making progress,” said Salloway, a professor at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. “You might have heard that Bill Gates announced he was investing $100 million in Alzheimer’s research. That’s terrific. We’re so excited about that. I think that’s going to stimulate others to donate as well.”

Special-education teacher Donna de Chauny doesn’t have millions to invest; like Gandsman, she answered Salloway’s call out of noble purpose.

“If some of the research that we participate in helps further the information that helps find a cure, then I am happy to participate,” de Chauny said.

“When you watch somebody you love go through it, it’s just terrible,” de Chauny said.

Before moving from her home in North Carolina to Warren, Collene’s symptoms had become increasingly pronounced, even as she endeavored to hide them.

“She knew she couldn’t remember things,” her daughter said. “Every time you’d talk to her on the phone, the same things would repeat themselves because she was trying to have a conversation. And she couldn’t really gather the words to react to what you were saying in an appropriate way.”

But she kept trying to maintain a veneer of normalcy, even after relocating to Rhode Island.

“She would pour her coffee on her cereal in the morning and think nothing of it,” de Chauny said. “We’d say, ‘I don’t think that’s going to taste too good, Mom.’ And she’d say, ‘Oh, that’s always the way I have it.’”

Collene was not the only family member to suffer from Alzheimer’s, de Chauny said; all three of her mother’s siblings also died of the disease.

Salloway spoke to that during the swabbing event, the second held at Butler, saying that remaining mentally and physically active and socially engaged appear to reduce risk, as do “eating a balanced, Mediterranean-type diet,” sleeping well, quitting smoking, maintaining healthy weight and blood pressure, and other measures. All are encapsulated in the mantra: “What’s good for the heart is good for the brain.”

But more than lifestyle is involved in Alzheimer’s, which is characterized by buildups of two proteins in the brain: tau, which forms tangles inside neurons, and amyloid, which forms damaging plaque in connections between nerve cells. The precise mechanism of these protein buildups is not entirely understood, but research has brought advances.

One recent development has been a type of Positron Emission Tomography, or PET, technology that can reveal the presence of plaque years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s appear; previously, a diagnosis could be confirmed only at autopsy, with a microscopic examination of the brain.

Another has been clinical trials of Aducanumab, a drug made by Biogen that has demonstrated success in reducing amyloid plaque. The drug holds such promise that the paper describing the research behind it made the cover of the Sept. 1, 2016, edition of Nature, one of the world’s leading science publications. Salloway was one of the paper’s authors.

A third is a technique being developed by Salloway’s group and a team led by Peter J. Snyder, professor of neurology at the Alpert Medical School and Lifespan’s chief research officer, that could be used to diagnose Alzheimer’s by retinal imaging, a relatively simple and inexpensive procedure that an ophthalmologist could perform.

And there is more promising research elsewhere in the state, including that conducted by University of Rhode Island neuroscientist Paula Grammas, whose work focuses on the role the vascular system plays in Alzheimer’s. Grammas is the inaugural director of the George and Anne Ryan Institute for Neuroscience.

Salloway projected a slide, “Rhode Island as an incubator for innovation in AD research,” that included a photo of Grammas with Governor Gina Raimondo, URI president David M. Dooley, and former CVS Health Chairman and CEO Thomas M. Ryan, who established URI’s Ryan Institute.

“Rhode Island — because of our small size, everybody knows everybody,” Salloway said, to laughter.

But proximity and determination have more than comic value. With both, collaboration can flourish.

“We could really be an innovation center for Alzheimer’s research and prevention studies,” Salloway said.

Without volunteers, innovation would slow. And so, Salloway urged his latest recruits to encourage others to join the army.

“You’re already doing a lot to fight Alzheimer’s,” he said, “but I want you to take the Alzheimer’s challenge. I want you to tell five other people that you came here tonight to find out about Alzheimer’s research. We hope you will spread the word around.”

And also, host “swabbing parties” at homes or civic organizations, with the Butler team handling the logistics.

To learn more about Alzheimer’s research at Butler and how to enroll in a study, call (401) 455-6402 or visit butler.org/memory

Alzheimer’s disease research funding

$448M

National Institutes of Health spending in 2011

$1.39B

NIH spending in 2017

$1.8B

NIH projected spending in 2018

$6B

NIH spending on cancer research in fiscal 2017


Sources: NIH, U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations

Source: Researchers build ‘citizens army’ in war against Alzheimer’s

Early Diagnosis Beneficial for People with Dementia

By Medicaid Planning and Gifting, Uncategorized

The devastating impact of Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia

A TPT documentary aims the national spotlight on looming Alzheimer’s “epidemic” and its financial and emotional toll on families. The devastating impact of Alzheimer’s disease and Dementia on his own mother — and on his father, who struggled to care for her — first prompted Gerry Richman to take a hard look at the disease. As vice president of national productions at Twin Cities Public Television, he was the mastermind behind a 2004 Emmy-winning documentary called “The Forgetting: A Portrait of Alzheimer’s.” Now, Richman is back with another eye-opening film on the subject. “Alzheimer’s: Every Minute Counts” — airing across the country Wednesday — chronicles the struggles of people living with Alzheimer’s and the emotional and financial challenges it poses for their families. It also forecasts, through interviews with doctors and researchers, a looming crisis for the country as baby boomers enter their senior years and their risk of developing Alzheimer’s increases.brain_slices

The current numbers are scary enough. More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s — with one new case identified every minute. In addition to the emotional toll, it can cost tens of thousands of dollars to take care of someone with Alzheimer’s, making it one of the most expensive diseases and provoking some health experts to predict that it will collapse both Medicare and Medicaid — and the finances of millions of people. Although Alzheimer’s can strike people younger than 65, it generally occurs in those much older. The risk of developing the disease doubles every five years after 65, according to the National Institute on Aging. It becomes much more common among people in their 80s and 90s. With longer life spans come greater numbers of people at risk of Alzheimer’s. “There hasn’t been a large population of 85-year-olds until this generation,” Arledge said.
The full article can be found HERE.

When you or your loved one is diagnosed with a cognitive issue, planning for how to handle the soon to be increased needs of your loved ones is critical. Discussions as to immediate and long term needs must be had with your medical advisers and with your financial advisers. Financial advisers are as important as medical as there must be a plan in place as to how to pay for the additional services needed.

When you need to develop a plan about how to handle the cognitive issues of a loved one, contact our office for a no-cost consultation to discuss your facts and options.

MJL-Blog-Footnote-1